Best Fantasy Books of 1990-1999

Below you will find a list of the fantasy books published in 1990-1999 that we enjoyed most.

The Earthsea Quartet

by Ursula Le Guin

The Earthsea Quartet brings together Ursula Le Guin’s four legendary Earthsea sagas for the first time in a single volume.

Series: Earthsea Saga: Book 1 - 4
Published: 1993

12+
10/10

Needful Things

by Stephen King

There is a new shop in town. Run by a stranger. Needful Things, the sign says. The oddest name. A name that causes some gossip and speculation among the good folks of Castle Rock, Maine, while they wait for opening day. Eleven-year-old Brian Rusk is the first customer and he gets just what he wants, a very rare 1956 Sandy Koufax baseball card. Signed. Cyndi Rose Martin is next. A Lalique vase. A perfect match for her living room decor. Something for everyone. Something you really have to have. And always at a price you can just about afford. The cash price that is. Because there is another price. There always is when your heart’s most secret, true desire is for sale…


Published: 1991

15+
10/10

The Mad Ship

by Robin Hobb

The Liveship Traders series continues with the second book, The Mad Ship. Althea Vestrit continues her quest to reclaim her rightful inheritance, the liveship Vivacia. The Vivacia has been seized by pirates led by the enigmatic Kennit, a man who believes that destiny leads him to become King of the Pirate Isles. The Vestrit family are nearing financial ruin which leads them closer to the mysterious Rain Wild Traders who own the ship. Amidst these events the mad ship, Paragon is once again launched despite the history of death and despair that surrounds him.

Series: The Liveship Traders: Book 2
Published: 1998

12+
10/10

Assassin's Quest

by Robin Hobb

Keystone. Gate. Crossroads. Catalyst. Fitz is about to discover the truth about the Fool's prophecy. Having been resurrected from his fatal tortures in Regal's dungeons, Fitz has once more foiled Regal's attempts to be rid of him. Now, back in his own body, and after months of rehabilitation, Fitz begins the painful and slow process of learning the ways of a man again. Under the watchful eye of Burrich, old King Shrewd's Stablemaster, Fitz must learn to cast off the wild but carefree ways of the wolf and enter once more the human world: a world beset ever more viciously by the relentless Red Ship Raiders who are now left free to plunder any coastal town they please. But more immediately, a world in which he finds he is utterly alone. Regal has stripped the kingdom of its riches and retired to the inland city of Tradeford. Of Verity, on his quest to find the legendary Elderings, there has been no word; Molly, Kettricken and the Fool have all vanished. Unless Fitz can find Verity and help him in his quest, the Six Duchies will perish and there will be no safe place to live.

"At the end of Royal Assassin Fitz had taken poison and died. Although we were sure that this was not the end for him, we eagerly anticipated how Robin Hobb might bring him back to life for the final installment of the trilogy. She did not disappoint." Fantasy Book Review

Series: The Farseer Trilogy: Book 3
Published: 1997

12+
10/10

The Hollowing

by Robert Holdstock

Although I have enjoyed all of the books in the series so far this has been the best structured with a true destination to get to after a long struggle encountering many myths that have been twisted for the situation. The character of Richard is very well written and believable as a man grieving for the loss of his son, but also gaining a better understanding of who he is. The series as a whole is gripping and I would say that apart from the short stories in The Bone Forest the books I have read so far should be read in the order that they have been written.

Series: Ryhope Wood: Book 3
Published: 1993

15+
10/10

The Waste Lands

by Stephen King

As a series progresses I find it becomes increasingly difficult to avoid repetition when attempting to put across exactly what it is I enjoy about the books. My reviews for The Gunslinger and The Drawing of the Three have explained why I am such a fan of the Dark Tower series but I believe that now, for this review of book three, the purpose should be to talk about whether the author has managed to maintain the very high level standards set in previous instalments.

Series: The Dark Tower series: Book 3
Published: 1991

15+
10/10

Ship of Magic

by Robin Hobb

After having read and thoroughly enjoyed the Farseer trilogy I was expecting more of the same again. I was not disappointed; in fact I found the writing of even higher caliber ...

Series: The Liveship Traders: Book 1
Published: 1998

12+
10/10

A Game Of Thrones

by George RR Martin

As warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robert bestows on him the office of the Hand. His honour weighs him down at court where a true man does what he will, not what he must ... and a dead enemy is a thing of beauty. The old gods have no power in the south, Stark's family is split and there is treachery at court. Worse, a vengeance mad boy has grown to maturity in exile in the Free Cities beyong the sea. Heir of the mad Dragon King deposed by Robert, he claims the Iron Throne.

Series: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 1
Published: 1996

15+
10/10

Wizard and Glass

by Stephen King

This book is about Roland, who he is and how he has become who has become. It helps to explain why he is so grim, so haunted. It could be argued that you could miss out most of this book as it serves to give little forward momentum to the series but what it does, and what is does very well, is give Roland the fleshing out he deserves. As the book that follows can be looked upon as King's The Seventh Samurai, Wizard and Glass can be almost read as a stand alone book, as King's homage to Romeo and Juliet.

Series: The Dark Tower series: Book 4
Published: 1997

15+
10/10

Sojourn

by RA Salvatore

After abandoning the perils of the underdark, Drizzt Do-Urden, the renegade dark elf, battles to survive in the harsh surface world and to gain acceptance from the surface-dwellers.

Series: The Dark Elf Trilogy: Book 3
Published: 1991

12+
10/10

Hawkwood's Voyage

by Paul Kearney

Paul Kearney is really one of the best writers writing at the moment. He is not only technically proficient but he’s also wonderfully entertaining, rarely leaving us with a dull moment or place to put the book down to sleep. Hawkwood’s Voyage, in whichever form you read it, is a must read, and belongs on the shelf next to authors like Steven Erikson and George R. R. Martin.

Series: Monarchies of God: Book 1
Published: 1995

15+
10/10

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

by JK Rowling

Harry Potter thinks he is an ordinary boy. He lives with his Uncle Vernon, Aunt Petunia and cousin Dudley, who make him sleep in a cupboard under the stairs. Then Harry starts receiving mysterious letters and his life is changed for ever. He is whisked away by a beetle-eyed giant of a man and enrolled in Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The reason: Harry Potter is a wizard!

"Do the Harry Potter books live up to the hype? When I first began reading the Philosopher’s stone I was immediately struck by how good - and laugh-out-loud funny - the humour was. You usually need to read a Terry Pratchett novel to ensure constant laughter throughout but Rowling has managed to infuse this book with a lovely wit and charm that will both amuse and delight adults and children."

Series: Harry Potter: Book 1
Published: 1997

9+
9/10

Blood Of Elves

by Andrzej Sapkowski

For more than a hundred years humans, dwarves, gnomes and elves lived together in relative peace. But times have changes, and now the races once again fight each other - and themselves. In this tumultuous time a child is born - Ciri has strange powers and a stranger destiny, for a prophecy names her as one with the power to change the world, for good or for evil. The witcher Geralt has taken Ciri to the relative safety of the Witchers' Settlement, but it soon becomes clear that Ciri is not like the other witchers. As the threat of war hangs almost palpably over the land, Geralt and Ciri are pursued by someone who understands exactly what the prophecy means - and exactly what Ciri's power is capable of. This time Geralt may have met his match.

"If, like me, you’ve never heard of Andrzej Sapkowski before, it’s about time that was rectified. Combining traditional fantasy with Polish folklore, Sapkowski’s Witcher series has been translated into seven languages, made into a TV series and most recently converted into a computer game. This is clearly not to be taken lightly. Blood of Elves is only the second book by the author to hit British shelves (The Last Wish was published in 2007) – it’s a pity it didn’t arrive sooner."


Published: 1994

12+
9/10

The Moon and the Sun

by Vonda N McIntyre

A winner of the 1997 Nebula award for best novel, Vonda N McIntyre’s The Moon and the Sun is a sumptuous work of alternate history. Set in 17th century France, at the court of the Sun King, the book’s attention to detail and flowing narrative help create an absorbing tale of fantasy, romance, science and history.

"The Moon and the Sun successfully melds fantasy and alternate history to create a charming, well-written and meticulously-researched novel that will appeal to readers who enjoy history and romance with a fantasy element." Fantasy Book Review


Published: 1997

12+
9/10

The Bloody Red Baron

by Kim Newman

This new edition is definitely worth the investment, not only does it contain the ‘writers cut’ (if you will) of the original story but also so many added bonuses, annotations, notes and other projects offering the reader fascinating glimpses inside the creative mind of Newman who has to be one of the premier horror writers of today.

Series: Anno Dracula series: Book 2
Published: 1995

15+
9/10

Royal Assassin

by Robin Hobb

Honesty is the bedrock for any relationship. But how can Fitz – royal bastard, trainee assassin, holder of secrets crucial to the security of the kingdom – bare his soul to his beloved Molly? Danger lies all around him – from the raiders savaging the coastal towns, and from within the court. The king has been struck down by a mystery illness and his eldest son, Verity, is bound up in the defence of the realm. When Verity leaves the court in search of the mythical Elderlings, Fitz finds himself friendless apart from his wolf, Nighteyes, and the king’s strange, motley-clad fool, exposed to Prince Regal’s malign ambitions. He will be asked to sacrifice everything – his heart, his hope, even his life – for the sake of the realm.

Series: The Farseer Trilogy: Book 2
Published: 1996

12+
9/10

Assassin's Apprentice

by Robin Hobb

In a faraway land where members of the royal family are named for the virtues they embody, one young boy will become a walking enigma. Born on the wrong side of the sheets, Fitz, son of Chivalry Farseer, is a royal bastard cast out into the world, friendless and lonely. Only his magical link with animals - the old art known as the Wit - gives him solace and companionship. But the Wit, if used too often, is a perilous magic, and one abhorred by the nobility. So when Fitz is finally adopted into the royal household, he must give up his old ways and embrace a new life of weaponry, scribing, courtly manners; and how to kill a man secretly, as he trains to become a royal assassin.

"Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb is the first book in her acclaimed work, The Farseer Trilogy. First published in 1995 the trilogy has been described as combining the magic of Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea with J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings."

Series: The Farseer Trilogy: Book 1
Published: 1995

12+
9/10

The Dragon Reborn

by Robert Jordan

The Dragon Reborn is the third in the Wheel of Time series and continues almost immediately on from The Great Hunt. This book contains two distinct paths to the climax, a feature throughout the series and one of the many reasons why I am such a big fan of the series.

Series: Wheel of Time: Book 3
Published: 1991

12+
9/10

Dracula Cha Cha Cha

by Kim Newman

What more could you ask for? Dracula meets the Giallo murder mystery and Bond! There is even a 1968 set novella Aquarius as an added bonus. This will chill and amuse the reader, transporting you to a bygone era of cinema and culture. Unmissable.

Series: Anno Dracula series: Book 3
Published: 1998

15+
9/10

Battleaxe

by Sara Douglass

A thousand years ago, the people of Achar drove the Forbidden from their lands. But now the northern tribes of the Ravensbund are fleeing south again, with nightmarish tales of creatures who feed upon the terror of their prey. Winter has come early, and with it the promise of war. Axis, bastard son of the dead Princess Rivkah, is sent north to the battlefront at Gorkenfort with his elite Axe-Wielders. Once there, he must hand over command to his hated half-brother, Borneheld, Duke of Ichar and heir to the throne. But during the long journey Axis falls in love with Faraday – Borneheld's betrothed – and finds himself reassessing the very essence of his beliefs. With the fate of the world hanging in the balance, Axis must unite the feuding lands under one banner before it is too late and the evil rising in the north engulfs them all for good.

"There is a reason classics are timeless - they energise and captivate, bringing the reader back for more, time and time again. Sara Douglass's Battleaxe sits up there with the great epic fantasy books of the last 30 to 40 years, easily holding its own against the likes of Tad Williams' The Dragonbone Chair, Terry Brooks' The Sword of Shannara and Raymond Feist's Magician. If you have never read Battleaxe, do so now, you won't regret the decision."

Series: Axis Trilogy: Book 1
Published: 1995

15+
9/10

A Clash Of Kings

by George RR Martin

Throughout Westeros, the cold winds are rising. From the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding lands of Winterfell, chaos reigns as pretenders to the Iron Throne of the Seven Kingdoms stake their claims through tempest, turmoil and war. As a prophecy of doom cuts across the sky - a comet the colour of blood and flame - five factions struggle for control of a divided land. Brother plots against brother and the dead rise to walk in the night. Against a backdrop of incest, fratricide, alchemy and murder, the price of glory is measured in blood.

"If you are looking for a tale that features more sword than sorcery and enjoy the nuances of epic battles then this will be just your cup of tea. If you have read Game of Thrones and want more of the same then this will not disappoint but unfortunately I was rather looking forward to finishing the book and not for all the right reasons. A good book but too long."

Series: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 2
Published: 1998

15+
9/10

The Sum of All Men

by David Farland

The Sum of all Men is the first book in David Farland’s Runelords series. The first of three books, the story continues in Brotherhood of the Wolf and Wizard Born.

Series: Runelords: Book 1
Published: 1998

12+
9/10

Northern Lights

by Philip Pullman

Northern Lights is the first part of Philip Pullman's acclaimed Dark Materials trilogy. The book was first published in 1995, a year in which the book also claimed the Carnegie Award.

Series: His Dark Materials: Book 1
Published: 1995

9+
9/10

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

by JK Rowling

The Dursleys were so mean and hideous that summer that all Harry Potter wanted was to get back to the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry. But just as he's packing his bags, Harry receives a warning from a strange, impish creature named Dobby who says that if Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts, disaster will strike.

"J.K. Rowling’s series began with the Philosopher’s Stone and The Chamber of Secrets continues the adventures of the young wizard Harry and his friends at Hogwarts."

Series: Harry Potter: Book 2
Published: 1998

9+
9/10

The Subtle Knife

by Philip Pullman

The sequel to Northern Lights, this is the second book in the 'His Dark Materials' Trilogy and introduces the character of Will Parry, a young boy who lives in Oxford (our world) with his ailing and increasingly confused mother and now on the run from a number of 'men in black' who seem to be searching for some letters sent from his missing explorer father, whom Will and his mother has not seen or heard from for years. After a scuffle with these mystery men, when they break into Will's home, one of the agents is accidentally killed and now Will must run for his life and try to find his father in order to help him and his mother. With his mother placed in the care of his old piano teacher Will ventures off and soon stumbles across a window to another world. Cittigazze is the City he stumbles across; but all is not well here, the place is deserted apart from a small, wild band of children who talk of spectres chasing away the adults. It is here he meets Lyra Belacqua, our heroine from the first book, who has traveled through the window from her world through the Northern Lights. Lyra has her Althiometer stolen and must retrieve something call the Subtle Knife in order to get it back. It soon becomes clear her and Will's meeting is not merely coincidence as Will becomes the successor to the previous owner of the Subtle Knife, which was made and resides in the City of Citigazze and is the key to opening an infinite number of windows to an infinite number of other worlds. Now they must find Will's father in order to put things right in Will's world and help his mother, but Mrs Coulter, who Lyra has already learnt is her real but not naturally maternal mother, has other plans for Lyra and is determined to destroy her. With the help of the witches and now also angels, Will and Lyra set off on this new and very dangerous quest.

Series: His Dark Materials: Book 2
Published: 1997

9+
9/10

Lords and Ladies

by Terry Pratchett

Lords and Ladies is one of fantasy author Mark A. Cropper's favourite books. Mark kindly took the time to tell FantasyBookReview.co.uk why he rates the book so highly - Terry Pratchett’s books have always been a bit of an enigma to me. On one hand they’re light, funny and almost poke fun at the Fantasy Genre. On the other; they often, if not always, contain a darkness which can be almost startling. My overall feeling about them is that he tends towards the former. It doesn’t stop me loving them but I often feel a bit cheated. Then there is “The Lords and Ladies”.

Series: The Discworld Series: Book 14
Published: 1992

12+
9/10

The Tale of the Body Thief

by Anne Rice

In Miami, 1992, a tropical garden of a city where corruption pulses beneath the lush surface is the perfect city for a vampire. Yet Lestat - hero, rock star, incorrigible seducer and the most powerful and sensual vampire of them all - prowls this savage garden in desperate misery. Restlessly pursuing the mystery of his dark existence, Lestat yearns to think, breathe and feel as a man, free of his nightmare immortality. When, stalked in his turn by the only creature able to grant his desire, Lestat rashly seizes the chance. While the Body Thief, cloaked in Lestat's immortal powers, lays a trail of carnage across America and the Caribbean, Lestat himself is abandoned to the fragility of human life, and discovers that a mortal body is no fit receptacle for a vampire's soul. Rejected by the other vampires, a tormented and appallingly vulnerable Lestat is forced to seek human help to recover his vampire self; help he abuses unforgivably when, in a mesmerizing climax, he succumbs to the basest urge in any nature.

Series: The Vampire Chronicles: Book 4
Published: 1992

15+
9/10

The Krytos Trap

by Michael A Stackpole

If you like your Star Wars, especially the street-level Star Wars (compared to the Jedi and galaxy spanning war stuff) then the X-Wing series is a must for you. Well written, clever storylines and amazing personalities and characters makes this series one of the best property driven series around, and beyond that, just one of the best series around.

Series: Star Wars: X-Wing: Book 3
Published: 1996

12+
9/10

Sword In The Storm

by David Gemmell

Sword in the Storm tells us about a young hero, Connavar of the Rigante. Burdened by the thought of his father being a coward, he’s eager to prove himself. His thoughts are often shadowed, but his heart beats true. The Seidh, malevolent forces of nature, sense his inner turmoil and decide to use him as a plaything, granting him one wish… When one day a bear attacks him and his friends, he refuses to give ground and attacks the animal, earning him mortal wounds and eternal glory. Against all odds he survives, and returns to his town a hero. This is only the beginning of his perilous journey… Will he be able to live up to his reputation and dreams, or will his inner demons consume him?

Series: The Rigante Novels: Book 1
Published: 1998

15+
9/10

Prince of Dogs

by Kate Elliott

Prince of Dogs is the perfect second book. It draws you on from the first outstanding introduction to this new universe and drops you off ready and willing for the third. Kate Elliott is a master of her craft, able to leave you breathless and emotionally wrung out with the simple flip of a page.

Series: Crown of Stars: Book 2
Published: 1998

12+
9/10

Gate of Ivory, Gate of Horn

by Robert Holdstock

This book takes us back to the start of Robert Holdstock’s Mythago Cycle, which with Mythago Wood followed Steven, the younger Huxley brother, into Ryhope wood. This book instead shows us Christian Huxley’s odyssey into the wood before Steven comes back from the war. The Huxley’s have always been drawn to the wood by their father George Huxley’s obsession with it and the Mythago Guiwenneth.

Series: Ryhope Wood: Book 6
Published: 1997

15+
9/10

Vurt

by Jeff Noon

Take a trip in a stranger's head. Travel rain-shot streets with a gang of hip malcontents, hooked on the most powerful drug you can imagine. Yet Vurt feathers are not for the weak. As the mysterious Game Cat says, ‘Be careful, be very careful’. But Scribble isn't listening. He has to find his lost love. His journey is a mission to find Curious Yellow, the ultimate, perhaps even mythical Vurt feather. As the most powerful narcotic of all, Scribble must be prepared to leave his current reality behind.

"Vurt offers its readers a host of original visions even as it riffs off the classical myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. Like one of Noon’s dream feathers, it is well worth consuming this book for it transports you to a richly imagined world of distorted realities and twisted fantasy. Its highly inventive blend of poetic and grotesque imagery lingers in the mind like the residue of a powerful dream." Karl Bell, Fantasy Book Review


Published: 1993

15+
9/10