Artemis Fowl and the Atlantis Complex by Eoin Colfer

Rating 9.0/10
Highly recommended totally enjoyable escapism with no fluffy bits.

Artemis Fowl was the first fantasy I read that was not about the green eyed, charismatic orphaned wizardling. I was probably around twelve and frankly I didn't understand a thing! So I did what most kids my age would do, I went on to read Artemis Fowl and the Arctic Incident. I didn't understand that either, but I loved Captain Holly Short! She was a badass, risk-taking elfin beauty with a hot red crew cut! I was going through puberty at the time and stories of timid, gorgeous, blonde princesses were getting on my nerves, so Holly came as a refreshing breath of air.

I tried reading both books again within a few years along with the then recently released Artemis Fowl and the Opal Deception. It was official. I had now slowly, possibly the same lovely way we hope Holly would, fallen in love with the annoying little criminal mastermind!

Artemis Fowl and the Atlantis Complex was probably the most... um... complex book in the series so far. Also, it was the least enjoyable. Not, God forbid, because Eoin Colfer has lost his touch but because the story was much more real and fleshed than his others. Artemis was not battling fire breathing goblins or farting dwarfs or Lady Gaga... I mean, Opal Koboi. He was battling himself, he was trying to get rid of the deep, dark demon that exists within all of us, telling us not to trust in our family or believe in our friends. It made the cocky teenager with an unbelievable IQ more human and more relatable. I loved the way Eoin Colfer has developed Artemis from that unfeeling, unlikeable little prick to a seventeen-year-old who feels and cares and is torn inside because he can't trust his friends anymore. And I love how Eoin Colfer has taken us into the mind of the villain, who isn't at all like the other villains in Artemis' escapades. I'm not going to say more because, well, you should find out for yourself...

For those who have been shipping Arty and aforementioned badass hottie Holly there might be some good news in this book. Although there aren't any 'momente de passione' like the previous book *ERM... SPOILER ALERT?* the chance of a human-elf relationship is in the books now if only Colfer could hurry up and write some more!
Dash Cooray 04/01/2012

“Once upon a time Artemis saw things that no one else could see, but now he sees things that are not there…”

This is the seventh outing for Eoin Colfer’s anti-hero Artemis Fowl and avid followers of this collection will attest that this is one character whose strong storylines and even stronger one line put-downs have in no way diminished from the fresh and innovative original.

Artemis has decided that the world needs to be saved and of course he is the only person mentally capable of successfully achieving such a feat. Bringing together, once again both human and fairie worlds in order to implement THE PLAN,  Artemis is joined on this latest adventure by the very capable Capt. Holly Short of the LEP, Foaly the terse but technological wizard of the LEPrechaun police force and Butler Artemis’ faithful, erm, butler.

Artemis has the most brilliant of minds, which is sometimes used for good, however, as brilliant as his 15 year old mind is it unfortunately seems his that it is no longer his own. Capt. Short, although previously having had a momentary lapse of intimacy with Artemis, is finding it hard to recognise our usually acid tongued genius, as he is acting, well sort of, nice… 

The Atlantis complex is not something you want to contract. Take a pinch of OCD, a smattering of delusional paranoia and a good dredge of multiple personalities and you get an idea of why Artemis isn’t quite feeling himself.

In addition to this slight hiccup in saving the world there’s also rogue ships, vicious robots, psychotic criminals, zombie wrestling fans and a plan to attack a well known subterranean city to contend with….Yes, there is a pooping dwarf too.

Aimed at young adults, but just as enjoyable for an old duffer like me, Eoin Colfer has managed to write a book that takes a current and serious issue such as global warming, a subject that is relevant to his readers generation and make it, well, entertaining, exciting, hopeful, terrifying and in places downright tear-streamingly funny. His writing throughout the series of Artemis Fowl books has always stayed true to his characters and as such they retain whole and instantly recognisable personalities, just like old friends.

Highly recommended totally enjoyable escapism with no fluffy bits. Bliss!
Amanda

This Artemis Fowl and the Atlantis Complex book review was written by

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Artemis Fowl and the Atlantis Complex reader reviews

from North Carolina

5-stars

The book was interesting with how Artemis had developed the "Atlantis Complex" and I loved the beginning of the book. And how it showed Artemis slowly developing the effects of the Complex over time. But then came the bits with Root. And that kind of turned me off from the book a little. I really wanted to stick with what Artemis and the gang was doing and not have 10 to 12 pages about the villain in the story. I found myself skipping most of the last part of the villains wareabouts. Because I had, had enough of the constant droning. But the conclusion between Artemis (A.K.A Orion) and how when Artemis got shocked it had released Orion and how they played that out till the very second the villain thought he had won was great! But the ending was meh at best and didn't have the feeling like The Time Paradox had.

from USA

6-stars

In short, I thought the thing that bothered me the most in this book is that what I loved about the series the most was the daring, ingenious plans that unfolded into beautiful action scenes testing each character's mental and physical capabilities to the limit, the odds mercilessly stacked against them. The Artemis Fowl protagonists make their own luck in their own unique way. I was hoping for an improvement from the Time Paradox and a fresh new crisis that would stretch the limits of the characters to the point that it forces character development. While I must acknowledge that it has been a few months since I read the novel and I might be missing something, the book seemed to have left me with the impression of some generic Saturday morning cartoon. The characters seemed to be whisked through the story and scenes by "luck". Not the self made luck that comes from years of preparation and skill but the luck that "the chosen one" gets for being the main character. There is something that happens too often to pieces of media that are works of beauty, a masterpiece. It could be a movie, a TV-series, a book, a video game, or something else. The world of media is swamped with mildly entertaining mediocrity but when a "masterpiece" or something comparable comes out like, Harry Potter, Halo, Modern Warfare 2, Lord of the Rings, the Dark Knight, and others they make what amounts to sometimes billions of dollars. Then, shortly after something mediocre is made that makes MORE money than its predecessor simply because of its reputation. Sometimes you have seen the prime of the series or it could be a hiccup, pulling through later with better content. It seemed that the first five books in Artemis Fowl were beautiful, being consistently better than the proceeding book. Maybe Colfer just needs a break but the last two books have seemed to fallen to above average and average categories respectively. I hope that the series can be renewed in the future and hopefully it has not ran out of steam and does not fall further into obscurity. Whatever the future brings Artemis Fowl (at least the first five books) is still an exceptional series and is considered by me to be a masterpiece.

from Washington

7-stars

This is my school review enjoy! In the novel “ARTEMIS FOWL: THE ATLANTIS COMPLEX” by Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl returns with a new goal: to save the world. As he begins to do this, he is confronted by an unknown foe, intent on destroying the city of Atlantis. As that story unfolds, there seems to be a subplot of Artemis fighting a disease-or rather a psychotic problem-that’s taking over his mind. This story takes place in current day Vatnajökull, Iceland, but also in Artemis’ mind itself. The seventh installment in the “Artemis Fowl” series, and also the sequel to “Artemis Fowl: The Time Paradox”, Eoin Colfer again creates a magical and vivid, yet logical and almost realistic world. As one reviewer, Entertainment Weekly said: “The world that Colfer creates is as vivid as any Shire, Gotham, or Galaxy Far, Far away in recent memory.” Eoin Colfer’s writing adds a deeper level of realism to the characters and highlights many attributes we see today, such as courage, compassion, humor, and alter egos. I would definitely recommend this book to any Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings lovers, but also to any fantasy lover. However, fantasy isn’t all that Eoin Colfer has to offer. Some of his other works include “AIRMAN”-a historical fiction-and another fiction, “HALF MOON INVESTIGATIONS”. Colfer lives in Ireland with his wife and their two children, but his books have spread all over the world, helping make him the “New York Times Best Selling Author”, of many wonderful books. His stories keep you on the edge of your seat, and up until you’ve burned the last of your midnight oil. P.S. I hope Eoin Colfer comes back and writes another Artemis Fowl book with that same blue, magical spark we saw in the first few books.

from San Diego

3-stars

Probably the worst book in the series. Because of the advent of Orion, we see less of Artemis, whose schemes have been the best part of the books so far. Almost all the characters have changed completely--Holly, Foaly, and Butler are not themselves anymore. Also, the Artemis's final scheme, which has been mind-blowingly ingenious in the previous books, is, sadly, so obviously transparent that I could tell that it was coming from the moment that the "final problem" came about. The ending was not only overly cliché but also created more "plot holes" than had been created in the previous books--none of the plot holes at the end of the 6th book were resolved. Frankly, Eoin's writing style, which has been mediocre at best, reaches an all time low in this new book--honestly, a fourth grader with a crayon could write better. For all of his other books, I was sad when they ended, for it meant putting down another great Eoin Colfer story. For Atlantis Complex, I couldn't wait to finish it, because it meant that I could finally put it down and write this review.

from Maryland

4-stars

I'm always up for a good mind-stimulating read, which is something I've always been able to depend on Colfer for. His books always kept me thinking, and his endings always got me to re-read his books again and again to try to catch every significant detail I might have missed hinting to the intricate twists and turns he weaves. I’ve grown to love the young yet enduringly intelligent Artemis Fowl; to have had to tolerate (and eventually I would go so far as to use the word ‘suffer’) through an entire book lacking the usual flair was a terrible shame. Artemis’s trademark almost annoyingly-cocky-yet-endearing air and the story’s typical out-of-the-ashes victory only obtained by sheer wit and very detailed planning taking place throughout the entire story right within the text but floating completely unnoticed right through our minds was desperately missed. I found myself thinking time and time again throughout the book, “oh he’ll come through with some ingenious unforeseen plan!” only to be sorely disappointed. The usual twist in Colfer’s books was glaringly absent. This story was almost boring in relation to the previous installments; no spark, no satisfying ending leaving the reader in awe, no real indication that the next page would get much better. Nevermind Artemis’s genius being inhibited by the OCD he contracts; Colfer’s own genius gets smothered in this novel. It was a sad day to finish an Artemis Fowl book without thinking “this guy really IS a genius.”

from Dubai

10-stars

This was the best Artemis Fowl book ever!!!!!!! Artemis is back with an alter ego named Orion, who makes the book very funny and enjoyable. Of course, Artemis's awesome lines and plans are back too along with a totally new, dark attitude... This book is just plain AWESOME!!!!

6.3/10 from 7 reviews

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