The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Rating 9.6/10
Patrick Rothfuss is one of the better storytellers around at the moment.

When friends hand me books to read, I am always suspicious of whether the books will be any good. Maybe it is my own great arrogance (or maybe one of many), but I just figure that – unless they are of a special few – I am the better judge of books. Thankfully, twice this theory has fallen by the wayside.

The book is called The Name of the Wind, and it is written by a new author, Patrick Rothfuss. This also had me a little worried, as I am becoming more and more wary of new authors. But my fears were groundless. More than groundless, they could even be called vaguely offensive to Rothfuss who proved himself in his first mass market literary outing to be nothing short of a genius.

The Name of the Wind, Day One of the Kingkiller Chronicles, quickly made its way into my top fantasy series list. The book, which is essentially an autobiography of a once famous now reclusive musician, arcanist and adventurer named Kvothe, is revolutionary – to my eyes at least – in its storytelling method. Autobiographical for the most part, it starts, finishes, and occasionally reverts to a narrative telling of the interview from whence the autobiographical information springs.

The story wraps around Kvothe’s life just as you would want, exploring his journey from childhood into adolescence, and a little of the way into maturity. The universe in which this story is set is beautifully and articulately created. This includes everything from a more academic style of magic then is normally employed all the way through to making storytelling and music a large part of the story.

Storytelling, in fact, seems to be a thread that will soon be picked up in the sequel, The Wise Man’s Fear (to be released sometime in 2009). Kvothe is not only relating his life story in a tale to the Chronicler (book one is Day One of the storytelling), but spent his early life as an Eduma Ruh; a travelling and performing group of people, gypsy-like in their lifestyles but with much more focus on their literary and musical talents.

There are a few tropes found in The Name of the Wind, but none are exploited to the point where you are remembering other stories. Kvothe is left as an orphan after his father’s study into the Chandrian unwittingly brings their attention down upon his family. From there Kvothe must make his way as an urchin, before he manages – miraculously – to gain entry into the University of the arcanist that had travelled with his father’s family so many years ago.

Kvothe’s life is very much split into sections, and we will no doubt see this continue as the succeeding books are released. The second section of Kvothe’s life depicts his life at the University, and his re-entry into music. His love for the beautiful Denna is a heartbreaking yet funny story, while his deeds and misdeeds at the University make for compelling and sympathetic reading.

But throughout the novel we are given hints at the greater parts of Kvothe’s life. The series is called the Kingkiller Chronicles, yet we don’t know which king Kvothe killed or why. His talents are obviously well known throughout the lands, yet he has only made himself known in the city of Tarbean. And revenge must be taken on the Chandrian, given his fervent attempts to regain entry into the University library after he was banned for life from ever entering.

Patrick Rothfuss is, in my opinion, one of the better storytellers around at the moment. Too early in the game to give him full marks or list him amongst the nobility of fantasy, but his place there is almost assured. Rarely do you find yourself taken out of the story, and no serious lack of writing skill can even be guessed at, let alone found.

If you haven’t already, make sure you pick up Patrick Rothfuss’s The Name of the Wind in time to read The Wise Man’s Fear in April of 09.

This The Name of the Wind book review was written by

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All reviews for: The Kingkiller Chronicle

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The Name of the Wind reader reviews

from UK

10-stars

Excellent. I am actually truly amazed at some of the reviews on here, calling into question Rothfuss' use of prose and language?! He is an excellent storyteller and his use of language is engaging, poetic, rhythmic and easy to soak in. The main character many people forget is a boy, an exceptional boy, who early on is established as a quick study who rarely repeats mistakes and has a wisdom that makes him seem older than he is. And he seems to have the best memory I'll grant that. So people who don't like that he excels at everything, I find only half true, he excels at things he puts his sharp mind to, but he still only has the understanding of an adolescent, and the temper too, both of which are key realistic character traits, recurring throughout the story. The first book reminded me of the Harry Potter series, except where the magic actually makes sense as it has 'scientific-esque' theory behind it (which the lack of magic and societal explanation and overdose of 'convenience' was my biggest bug bear of the Potter series). I for one could not put these books down, I laughed out loud many times at characters being themselves and coming fools of situations, and It does use many storytelling stereotypes (like girls falling for him, him being the best (almost like being 'the one') but the story is so fluidly and believably told, you don't really realise until you look back. Utterly refreshing and I cannot praise these books enough.

from Indonesia

1-stars

If Kvothe is so good with his musical instrument, his main focus should have been to firstly find a lute so he can earn money instead of begging and stealing for food. If he's so smart, shouldn't he have realized not to use a lit candle in the Archives? Dozens of other inconsistencies that makes this a super boring and stupid book.

from Greece

1-stars

One of the worst fantasy book I've ever read. Cant understand the hype for this trilogy. Boring characters, miserable main character, dull story, trying to persuade u that its a big and epic story and never manage to succeed it. VERY VERY OVERESTIMATED! I wanted to like it, tried hard to finish 1st book , tried harder to finish 2nd book. So many hours reading wasted!

from Canada

1-stars

Worst writer I ever read. His prose is so bad, I started wondering if he ever finished grade school.

from United Kingdom

1-stars

Very poor indeed. Literally went in and out of this book only to find he was droning on about the same thing 100-200 pages latter i.e being in debt, getting out of debt, moaning on about women etc. He has to be good at everything also which I find tedious. Their are also no positive representations of women in this book either which I find problematic. This doesn't deserve the high scores it is getting.

from Ireland

10-stars

An amazing book, and everyone who says they can't relate to the characters, or that they are dull just lack the imagination required to truly read the story, and not just look at the words on the page.

from USA

5-stars

My main issue with the book wasn't the plot - I'm a sucker for anything fantasy - but the style. I felt as though characters were in the present day. Their interaction felt very modern in this setting, and it was out of place. During dialogue, a character would correct themself with "wait," before presenting a thought or "like" as a filler. Both of these are modern phrases, and that caused a very noticible disconnect from the setting. I do have some problems with the main character. Yes, his story is tragic, but it's the underdog story. The "hero risen from nothing" troupe. His back story feels a lot like a back story I created for my first elder scrolls character. I understand some of the symbolism in the story, and the themes are nice as well, but Kvothe himself is, to be honest, a whiny, grumpy, sulking, hero man. The entire book also felt like exposition. A big sad backstory, which is fun for the first 200 pages, but gets old. Kvothe's drama gets boring and obnoxious. There are some good qualities. I think the side characters are interesting, though simple. Some unresolved plots kept me guessing as rhe story went on, and visually it was very good and detail oriented. Good writing, when it wasn't about characters or dialogue. Pretty okay book.

from Lithuania

3-stars

Story is nice and all. But I really hate how the main character is a super hero, very best at everything. Always going around saving towns. Doing all the stupid s**t for glory, like some Kardashian.

from Sweden

10-stars

Awesome book with great insight into the characters life. Couldn't put it down.

from England

10-stars

Really spectacular book. If you love fantasy (or just love great books in general) then this is a must read.

from US

10-stars

This is such a great read, Rothfuss Really is a master of words. I've heard this book catch some flack for the less than realistic portrayal of Kvothe. Ignore the critics. Anyone who thinks of Kvothe as being shallow and to perfect clearly hasn't looked far past the surface. The book is a tragedy at heart, and Rothfuss is slowly building up to that downward turn. Engaging read.

from US

10-stars

I'll try to keep this brief. Patrick Rothfuss is a genius. The world and the characters he creates are completely fleshed out, and the prose is magnificent. This is easily one of the best, most absorbing books I've ever read, and it's absolutely astounding to me that this is a debut novel. Nothing more needs to be said. That's it. If you like fantasy go pick up a copy, and READ IT RIGHT NOW.

from USA

10-stars

Firstly, as continuously written throughout the reviews (regardless of rating), Pat's elegant writing compliments the story superbly. It was written numerous times in other reviews that the character lacked depth, was the "sh*t" at "everything," or no emotional connection existed. For these people, and mind you they have their right to feel how they feel, but for these people, I feel tremendously sorry. They clearly lack the emotional depth and intellectual thought required to fully grasp what Mr. Rothfuss has done here. This story has a centralized character from which it extends. If you desire 30 point-of-view characters (which works Very Well for certain storylines ~ GRRM is phenomenal) then this would not be the read for you, at this moment in time. Nonetheless, I would still compel you to Read This Story...Someday. Whether Tomorrow, next year, or in 20, you Must experience what Kvothe has to offer. Frankly, it balances far better than most novels. Many attempt to instigate emotion in the reader whilst a major arc occurs, and unfortunately many fail miserably. This story, which revolves around One man (and his supporting cast mixed throughout), envelopes the reader in his love, his loss, his pain, and overall his passion for the answers he seeks. His drive, though motivated partially by revenge and partially due to his inquisitiveness, will carry the reader from the beginning to the end. If you've ever loved, ever lost, ever suffered, ever smiled, ever Felt something stronger and deeper than "cool story bro," then you must read this book. It's a story of a man, not a glamour show of an army, of a king, or of a country. It's the reality of his world, the severe loss he suffered, and how he manages to survive and overcome it. And simply put, it significantly touches on relevant tribulations in our own lives today. Give it a chance, and you will not regret it. Cheers.

from Vienna

9-stars

This was one of the best fantasy books I've read in recent times. It made me a smile a great deal while reading, so well was it written. It shared elements with many of the books I have enjoyed most: Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Hobb's The Realm of the Elderlings and Le Guin's Earthsea saga. After the first 300 pages (about halfway) I would have given the book 10 out of 10 but the standard dropped a wee bit, and although the book was still good I felt it lacked the wonder of what had preceded. Thankfully the denouement closed everything off masterfully in an enthralling finale and I look forward to reading Wise Man's Fear.

from England

4-stars

At times the style of the writing can be very pleasing, but the story is poor, sorry, I mean, very very very poor. Nothing really happens - in the whole book - except one incident with a dragon which I won't spoil. But apart from that it's just a long boring grinding story of some kid learning the first steps in becoming a magician. Not a single decent fight in 600 pages. I bought this because a review site listed it as number one in a list of the 20 best fantasy novels. Fantasy indeed.

from UK

10-stars

Great book! One of the best I have ever read. I look forward to the third day!

from HU

5-stars

It is beautifully written, I mean really. However the character is boring and as previous reviewers said, is actually an impulsive asshole who is the best at everything. His most important characteristic is poor, orphan, very clever, good intentions, always looking for trouble even when unnecessary . In my opinion if he would behave how he does he would already be quite dead by the middle of the 2nd book. I was enduring because the world is cleverly set-up, and as I wrote above, in my opinion it is nicely written. Sometimes you read a part of the book and you have the feeling that 2 months passed, then it comes out that all this happened in 1 week.

from Canada

1-stars

This is the worst book I have ever read. Boring characters, boring setting, boring plot. C'mon Rothfuss, this is terrible, worst 22 hours of my life that I will never get back.

from USA

6-stars

I wanted to say first that this book was well written. It's an easy ready with many different interesting events. There is a lot of creativity that is involved, and often it kept me reading. Though these are huge pluses when I read this book, there are many events in the book that made me roll my eyes repeatidly. The main character, Kvothe, seems ridiculous as he is able to do anything. Basically Rothfuss made this character seem like a god who can do anything, has many jealous of his intelligent, and has many women wanting him.

from Netherlands

10-stars

I love both books! Can't wait for the third one :) but i have to say that the bar is pretty high now... difficult to like other books..:P

from Mexico

2-stars

The main character is completely unbelievable and totally disconnected. He's simply the best at everything. He's literally too cool for school. Every girl wants him, all his friends want to be him and the world is just in awe at how awesome he is. He saves women from burning buildings, saves entire towns from huge dragons is the wittiest person you've ever met (and the most handsome), all at age 15. Yet what really makes him feel like a hero (despite all he's accomplished in this book) is when he teaches a little girl a foreign saying to make her feel better. Of course, it's even more amazing when the saying is said in the deep, baritone voice he admits to having. Just incredible indulgence in character development. Absolutely ridiculous. Could really learn a lot from Mr. Martin.

from Canada

10-stars

This book is amazing; as some have mentioned, it draws you in. Specially for those who have gone through tougher times, or less than ideal circumstances, who may be able to relate to Kvothe's pain and poverty; it really engages and enthralls you. Those people that get tired of Kvothe alluding to the fact that he's poor have probably never gone through similar circumstances. All I got to say on that.

from England

1-stars

For me this was the worst fantasy book I have ever read! Boring story from the start to the finish! I cannot believe all the positive reviews it has got! There was nothing happening on those 600 hundred pages, the whole story (600) pages seemed to be the only start for another book... well could be the trick to persuade readers to buy another book but I surely won't. So glad I finished reading it... wasted time reading this rubbish when there are plenty more of good books to read.

from Netherlands

9-stars

Amazing book, but sometimes repetetive. There are so many things in the books which aren't being written but you have to figure out yourself if you can, but does not matter much if you cannot. Great read for everyone!

from Canada

10-stars

How often do you find a story that is most likely going to be a tragedy so entertaining. It's also rare to have such a personal and intimate connection with the protagonist as the reader has with Kvothe. The writing was poetic and flowed so well even a dull section of the book (a rarity!) feels smooth. Kvothe's interaction with everyone around him was wonderful and even minor characters seem fully developed and important to the plot. A unique take on magic, heroism, fantasy writing and a must read for anyone who likes reading.

8-stars

I have to say I really liked this book. I read it a few years ago, and just keep coming back to it. I really like the way that his story is told, and trying to understand how Kvothe went from the boy he was to the man he is in the book's present. I can understand why there are those that feel that the book isn't very good, but I think that for the first book in a trilogy it is very good. It sets up so many things for the next books, and I really love the writing. Read the book out loud, and you'll find that there are some beautiful phrases and placement of words, as if someone used to telling stories really is telling the story. Anyway, I think it's a book that can be enjoyed by many people.

from Atlanta

10-stars

WOW - I can't imagine anyone saying this series is no good. Dude [Rothfuss] is a frigging fantasy wizard, and both this and book two are full of little clues and puzzles (he actually gives the ultra fan something to do while waiting for the next book). GE-NI-OUS!!! I can't wait for 'The Doors of Stone" - BTW all my guessing had me guessing this title only refers to the two Lackless doors at the Lackless estates and within the university archives. Upon further review, I believe the gray stones have to be included in that. Remember the folklore surrounding them 'they mark old roads/safe places' according to Kvothe, but Simon believes they bad things. Older cultures, who would understand them proper, would probably see them as a good thing [a way of escape from trouble], while those who don't understand them completely would only see them as dangerous, because they probably have learned to associate them with appearances by Fay creatures. Remember, Falurian suggests there are many doors to move between the mortal an Fayan realms for those who know how. I'd be willing to bet that both the University and Lackless estate are build on/around these stones [ we already know that one of these stones exists at the bridge near the university. That door in the archives must somehow lock this passageway. Furthermore one of those two doors [Lackless or university] must be locking away Alaxle 'Lax' the most powerful of the shapers (the one who stole the moon).

from Antwerp, Belgium

7-stars

I must say this was a very good book. But if I were to give word to one of the flaws in this book, it is that the main character - that is supposed to be a very smart guy - does really stupid things on many occasions. Still, worth reading though!

from New York

3-stars

I continued to be shocked that people like this book as they do - so shocked that I had to comment on it if only to banace out its ratings. The intrigue is fairly well set up, but goes absolutely nowhere, and what should be the climax of the first book ends up being an exceedingly long tangent about a drugged dragon. And also, we get it, Kvothe, ylou're poor. You didn't need to say it two hundred times.

from Canada

10-stars

Like many read this on a whim. Literally by the time you finish the first page - which was beautifully written - you ask yourself, how have I never heard of this before?

from New Zealand

10-stars

Patrick Rothfuss' is an incredible writer - these are the best books (fantasy or otherwise) I have read in a long long time.

from Glasgow

3-stars

I just don't get the adulation heaped on this guy. Narrow focus, no set pieces, little in the way of emotional resonance, and a section towards the end that is completely superfluous. Although written well, it needs more. I won't be reading any more of this series as there are plenty more books to read.

from Spain

7-stars

Nice storytelling, that's it. I love this book, it is absorbent, easy to read, but at the end it seems to me like an empty book. It is an extensive intro that could be summarized in less than half of the book length.

from Australia

10-stars

This is a fantastic novel. Allowing you to escape from your own world for a while is what a fictional novel is, but Rothfuss has taken this to a whole new level as The Name of the Wind actually draws you IN to the book. I laughed and cried with the main character which is something that most authors can only hope to achieve. This novel really is where the ordinary becomes extrordinary and the impossible becomes possible.

from London

10-stars

One of the best fantasy novels in decades. Engaging characters and a compelling plot. All those I have recommended it to have loved it.

from Pakistan

10-stars

One of my favorites as a young teen. Really pulls your heart.

from Ohio

10-stars

This is the kind of book you will read more than once. Great writing and a lead character that will stick with you.

from Boston

10-stars

A passionate, delightful book in every way. Perhaps not as technically polished as Martin or Hobb, but their equal for imagination and characterization. More than that, this is just a book that feels good to read on a snowy evening, fantasy in the old sense, a book that will envelop you and let you escape into a world that's just legendary enough to leave you craving more at the last page.

from Germany

10-stars

I have read it in 2 Languages more than 8 times. Definitely my favorite.

from Netherlands

10-stars

Best book ever! Couldn't put it away after the first 50 pages. My all time favourite!

from Sweden

4-stars

This is nice first try but not a good novel. Rothfuss would maybe have gained a lot by waiting to release this ill-edited, illogical version, then rewrite it and most of all move the last hundred pages to the next installment.

from Indonesia

10-stars

I truly enjoyed this book, it is amazing. The plot keeps going on without ever failing to make me picture itself. Simply put, I couldn't stop myself reading this book until I finished it, and now that I did, I can't stop waiting and wanting the second book. Buy it, read it, you won't regret it.

from Tempe, AZ

10-stars

I honestly come to a loss for words. All I can say is anyone who can even slightly enjoy a fantasy needs to read this book because it truly is fantastic. By page 100 I knew this book would instantly become one of my all time fav's.

from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

9-stars

The language. The main character. The plot. What can I say? To understand the hype, you have to read the book. I've been promoting this book shamelessly among my friends and family. This book has EVERYTHING you could possibly want: romance, scientific facts, amazingly beautiful writing, magic... And, apparently, in the next book: sex. Buy this book. You won't regret it.

from Cumbria, UK

9-stars

I bought this book on a whim, and I'm glad I did. The storytelling is absolutely effortless, and continues to engage you from start to finish. For a first book, it's as good as you can get, I only hope that the sequel can achieve as much. I read it cover to cover in under a day and then read it again, the only reason I gave it a 9/10 rating is so the sequel can get a 10/10 if it's better!

from Fitchburg

8-stars

Well I gave it a 8 because this is my first fantasy book I have ever read. All I've got to say is wow, this book keep my interested all the way through. There wasn't much in the way of epic battles or anything like that, but it was a well writtten story. Can't wait for the next book to come out.

from California, USA

9-stars

I think this book is just about as close to a 10 star rating as you can get. It's the first book that actually made me cry for the character. The writing is fluid and beautiful and though the story is a little tragic I can't wait for more.

7.4/10 from 48 reviews

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