The Silver Chair by CS Lewis

The Silver Chair book cover
Rating 8.4/10
The themes of bullying, trusting Aslan and faith in other people all echo through this story with a

The first book in the Narnian series to not feature the Pevensie children was an enormous risk for Lewis, but with a strong introduction to Eustace in Voyage Of The Dawn Treader, the book stars Eustace and Jill Pole who find themselves in Narnia after being chased by a group of bullies at their school.

This book introduces more creatures into the Narnian world, it has giants, witches, giant owls and the marshwiggles whose resident Puddleglum assists the children on their adventure.

Eustace and Jill attend a school called Experiment House where all creativity and all things magical are squandered. While being chased by bullies the two are transported into Narnia where it has been many years since the events of The Dawn Treader.

The two are transported by giant owls to meet Puddleglum who is deliciously melancholy and providers a great negative to the children's positive. It is this relationship that makes this story intriguing and providers a lot of humour for the reader.

From here the children must pass through the man-eating giants and into the Underland where the Lady Of The Green Kirtle (The Green Witch) has enslaved Prince Rillian and save his life and the future of Narnia.

Once again as I have said in all the other reviews Lewis takes a completely different path from the previous stories and keeps everything fresh and in a completely different part of Narnia making the land feel real.

The themes of bullying, trusting Aslan and faith in other people all echo through this story with a resounding success.

The Green Witch is delightfully evil and a comparable villain to the others in previous stories. The Man-Eating Giants keeps thing slightly dangerous but more amusing for the most part.

The Silver Chair is the second last adventure that Lewis wrote about Narnia and manages to maintain interest in the highly popular series and attempt to begin to wrap up the Narnia chronicles.

This The Silver Chair book review was written by

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All reviews for: The Chronicles of Narnia

Have you read The Silver Chair?

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The Silver Chair reader reviews

from SA

10-stars

Honestly, this book is just AMAZING. Don't really see any racism, nor that any non-narnians are evil. It's a great adventure, the hidden meanings scattered throughout are really well done. This is a great adventure story, would recommend it!

from Israel

6-stars

A great adventure story overshadowed by Lewis pushing his propaganda on the reader, regarding Christianity (Aslan resembles more and more of Jesus), misogyny (seriously? another evil witch?), conservatism (his hatred towards the experimental school and its values) and semi-racism (must all the non-Narnias be evil?). Moreover, the Pevencies replacements are not such interesting characters - I mean, Eustace was a great sidekick but is not an interesting main character, and Jill and Puddlegum are stereotypical at best. But some of the adventures are fun and thrilling and it’s still worth a read.

from South Africa

10-stars

I am Samantha Chifike and i want to do a review on this book Eustice and Jill are whisked to the land of Narnia where Aslan the great lion neesd their help to find the missing Prince Rilian .Teaming up with Puddlegum the Marsh Wiggle the search takes them through some of the most dangerous underland of Narnia.Even if they attain their goal ,it can only be the start of further trouble...

8.6/10 from 4 reviews

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