Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett portrait image to appear alongside the Terry Pratchett biography.

The English fantasy author, Terry D. J. (David John) Pratchett was born on the 28th April 1948 in the town of Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire. His was educated at High Wycombe Technical High School.

He wrote is first story when he was thirteen years old (1961) and with the money that he made from selling this he was able to buy his first typewriter. In 1971, Pratchett had his first novel published; it was called The Carpet People.

The official Terry Pratchett web site (UK)
The official Terry Pratchett web site (US)

Terry Pratchett is best known for the fantasy novels that make up the Discworld series. This series now comprises of more than forty books and is a humorous and at times satirical work set on a disc-shaped world that is carried on the backs of four giant elephants. The first book of the Discworld series was entitled The Colour Of Magic and is reviewed here. The Colour Of Magic was published in 1983 but he continued to work until 1987 when he was able to become a full-time author.

Terry Pratchett was awarded the OBE (The Most Excellent Order Of The British Empire, Officer) in 1998 for his services to literature. Terry Pratchett has also received honorary doctorates from the Universities of Warwick, Portsmouth, Bath and Bristol. He has sold over 40 million books worldwide and these have been translated into thirty-three different languages. He is second only to J. K. Rowling in terms of book sales in the United Kingdom.

It is believed that 1% of all the books sold in England are penned by Pratchett. His books have been translated into 36 different languages and have sold over 60 million copies.

Sir Terry Pratchett was made a knight in the New Year Honours list (2008). He received the honour for services to literature.

Terry Pratchett books reviewed

Critical acclaim

... for The Discworld series

Satirical, historical, fantastical and irresistible. Daily Mail

The best humorous English author since P.G. Wodehouse. Sunday Telegraph