The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski

(9.0/10)

"Only Evil and Greater Evil exist and beyond them, in the shadows, lurks True Evil. True Evil, Geralt, is something you can barely imagine, even if you believe nothing can still surprise you. And sometimes True Evil seizes you by the throat and demands that you choose between it and another, slightly lesser, Evil.”

The Last Wish is the first novel by the Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski to be published in English of The Witcher series (translated by Danusia Stok!) It is the collection that inspired CD Projekt Red's badass Witcher video games, of which I am a huge fan of. I've been playing those games for years, with the intention of eventually getting to the source material. Mainly the setback was that it took a long-ass time for the English translations to be released. Then of course there is the problem of an endless TBR... which truly is a wonderful problem to have! But it makes getting to a series more difficult, of course. There's just.. so much out there that I want to devour! With season one of the Netflix adaptation having finished production, here I am. Finally.

The Witcher game series takes place within this world (an unmapped land known as the Continent), but is set years after the final book. The games aren't direct adaptations, rather, they are spin-offs. Written in 1993, The Last Wish introduces us to Geralt of Rivia. In the first game, Geralt suffers from amnesia & doesn't remember any of the events that happened in these books. The books consist of two short story collections & five full-length novels.

Witchers are genetically enhanced humans that train intensely from an early age to battle monsters. After years of mental & physical torture... er... "training," they go through a ritual where most do not survive. Those that do are never the same. They become merciless assassins with magical powers that are immune to most diseases. They also gain an unnaturally long life span, yet become sterile.

The Last Wish is a loosely connected collection of six short stories. It actually took me a hot second before realizing that because the book is broken up into chapters, which made it seem like one full story. It literally begins with Geralt getting fucked, which... if you've played the games, you know this isn't out of character. Dude doesn't have any trouble getting laid, that is for sure.

My favorite was the titular story, The Last Wish. Unsurprising, really. This is when  Geralt meets Yennefer, the powerful sorceress who I couldn't help but fall in love with in the game.

::Spoiler:: Having to choose between Yen & Triss is one of life's toughest decisions! ::End spoiler::

Oof.

I was also happy to see more of Dandelion, the bard (& Geralt's best friend), in these stories. He steals each scene he is in! The Last Wish managed to give him more depth & elevate the friendship that we get a glimpse of within the games.

Delightfully dry humor, mythology brimming with radical creatures & a group of interesting characters, The Last Wish is a great introduction to this universe. However, something I was missing is the detailed world-building I look for in a first book. Because these are short stories, it feels like it jumped around in terms of fleshing out the Continent. I'm assuming this will be rectified further in the series, considering there are plenty more books to detail such things.

I'm thoroughly looking forward to more of Geralt's adventures!
Holly Grimdragon, 8/10

This review has been reproduced courtesy of OF Blog of the Fallen. The review is by Larry and the original can be seen here - The Last Wish review - OF Blog of the Fallen.

For over four years, Andrzej Sapkowski has been one of those authors that has been dangled in front of me, mentioned in passing by Polish readers here and elsewhere, along with an occasional mention on a couple of non-English-language sites that I frequent on occasion. Maciek (Vanin) in particular has been one who has been singing his praises to me, even going so far as to post a link to a fan-translated story (one that was done with Sapkowski's blessing, I later learned). What I read was intriguing enough for me to want more. I looked into buying the Spanish-language editions, but the shipping costs (close to $25 per book) were too prohibitive for me to import from Spain and I never could find any available in American online stores. So I waited. And waited some more, fearing that Sapkowski might never be published in English translation. Until last year, when I heard that Gollancz, perhaps influenced by the upcoming The Witcher game (which stars the main character, Geralt, of most of Sapkowski's stories), agreed to publish some of Sapkowski's work in English translation for the UK market. The Last Wish is the first of those works to be published in English.

The Last Wish is a slender, 280 page collection of six loosely-connected stories and intervals starring Geralt. Originally released in 1993 in Poland as Ostatnie Zyczenie, The Last Wish contains some of the oldest of the Geralt tales, although it was not the first Geralt book released in Poland. It is, however, an excellent introduction to the character and to the type of story that Sapkowski apparently wants to tell.

Geralt is a Witcher, an altered human being who has enhanced eyesight, a quicker healing/recovery mechanism for his body, and supposedly immune to most of the normal human emotions (although some of his interactions with various characters belies this to some extent). As a Witcher, Geralt's task is to roam the countyside and towns, looking for and destroying true monsters. While this might sound like a perfect D&D-style adventure series, Sapkowski quickly shows a combination of a sly wit and a tendency to not just subvert these adventure tropes, but to twist them and spin them upon their head until they collapse, too dizzy to assert themselves in the story themes.

Although Geralt is trained as a killer and does have some impressive skills as a fighter, violence is not a staple of these stories. Rather, it appears to be that there are two overarching themes to these tales: overcoming first impressions and the notion that the truest monsters might have a comely appearance and be fair of speech. Geralt elaborates on this in one scene:

"People," Geralt turned his head, "like to invent monsters and monstrosities. Then they seem less monstrous themselves. When they get blind-drunk, cheat, steal, beat their wives, starve an old woman, when they kill a trapped fox with an axe or riddle the last existing unicorn with arrows, they like to think that the Bane entering cottages at daybreak is more monstrous than they are. They feel better then. They find it easier to live."

Each of these stories have moments like this, moments where Geralt shows that his greatest strength is not in how fast he can decapitate a monster (although he does this on occasion) or how quickly he can evade an attack (these, too, occur on occasion), but rather in how he is able to take a keener look than his companions at what is truly at stake. There are moments of humor here, as when a monster, Nivellen, discovers that by being generous with his gold, he can get quite a few merchant's daughters for a bit more than the usual roll in the hay. How Geralt deals with Nivellen is one of the more humane and understanding stories that I've read in this genre of work, but I'll leave that story's conclusion to the gentle reader.

There are many elements of Slavic mythology, from various creatures that do not have exact analogues in Western mythologies to codes of behavior, that make this collection a bit more mysterious to me. I suspect there are a few elements that would be funny to a Polish or other Eastern European-reading audience but which might be taken more literally by the likes of me, born and raised on Western European and Southern mythologies. Perhaps this is the main reason why, despite selling over two million copies of his works in certain European countries, Sapkowski had to wait almost twenty years for the first English-language publication of his work. It is a shame that it has been this long, as I believe that there are enough elements in common that most fantasy readers in the English-speaking world can relate to and enjoy them to much the same degree as German and Spanish-speaking readers have enjoyed Sapkowski for years.

Summary: The Last Wish is a series of connected short stories that recount the adventures of a Witcher named Geralt. Told in third-person omniscient PoV, these tales take traditional fantasy adventure motifs and play with them in a parodical fashion on occasion. Highly recommended for those who like a mixture of humor and depth to their stories, especially to those who like Neil Gaiman or Terry Pratchett.

Review by

4 positive reader review(s) for The Last Wish

All reviews for Andrzej Sapkowski's The Witcher series


Season of Storms
7.8

Geralt of Rivia. A witcher whose mission is to protect ordinary people from the monsters created with magic. A mutant who has the task of killing unnatural beings. He uses [...]


The Last Wish
9.0

Geralt is a witcher, a man whose magic powers, enhanced by long training and a mysterious elixir, have made him a brilliant fighter and a merciless assassin. Yet he is no o [...]


Sword of Destiny
7.8

Geralt is a witcher, a man whose magic powers, enhanced by long training and a mysterious elixir, have made him a brilliant fighter and a merciless assassin. Yet he is no o [...]


Blood Of Elves
8.3

For more than a hundred years humans, dwarves, gnomes and elves lived together in relative peace. But times have changes, and now the races once again fight each other - an [...]


Time of Contempt
8.0

Geralt the Witcher has fought monsters and demons across the land, but even he may not be prepared for what is happening to his world. The kings and armies are maneuvering [...]


Baptism of Fire
9.5

The Wizards Guild has been shattered by a coup and, in the uproar, Geralt was seriously injured. The Witcher is supposed to be a guardian of the innocent, a protector of th [...]


The Tower of the Swallow
8.8

The world has fallen into war. Ciri, the child of prophecy, has vanished. Hunted by friends and foes alike, she has taken on the guise of a petty bandit and lives free for [...]

15+

The Last Wish reader reviews

from United States

Hard to follow, don't know who's talking, very confusing.

from Nigeria

I love it so much!

from Serbia

I forgot to say, I recommend this wonderful book to anyone who is a fan of fantasy and Tolkien and those who are not.

from Serbia

I have to say, although some parts in that book were confusing, I still enjoyed it. An excellent combination of fantasy, dark humor and Slavic mythology, finally someone who can add something original. Great job, I just wish he could write more the Witcher novels, but I guess you can't have everything.

9.8/10 from 5 reviews

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